Bare Bones paper to illustrate the format and content of papers.

The Observed High Tide on Earth Opposite the Moon Can't be Due to the Gravity of the Moon

If the gravity of the moon is always directed toward the moon, then the observed high tide on earth opposite the moon can't be due to the gravity of the moon. The gravity of the moon is always directed toward the moon. Therefore, the observed high tide on earth opposite the moon can't be due to the gravity of the moon.

Because the earth is between the moon and the water on the earth opposite the moon, any force on the water opposite the moon that is directed toward the moon would pull that water toward the earth. The gravity of the moon is an example of such a force. Pulling the water toward the earth would result in a low tide. Since we observe a high tide opposite the moon we can conclude that: if the gravity of the moon is always directed toward the moon, then the observed high tide on earth opposite the moon can't be due to the gravity of the moon.

It is a well established scientific principle that the gravity of any mass is directed toward that mass. The gravity of the sun, for instance, pulls the earth toward the sun and keeps the earth in orbit around the sun. We can then affirm that the gravity of the moon is always directed toward the moon.

If the gravity of the moon is always directed toward the moon, then the observed high tide on earth opposite the moon can't be due to the gravity of the moon. The gravity of the moon is always directed toward the moon. Therefore, the observed high tide on earth opposite the moon can't be due to the gravity of the moon.


Notice that this bare-bones example paper conforms to the pattern that is required:

The main argument is a conditional argument of the "If A, then B. Affirm A. Conclude B." variety and is included in the first paragraph. Support for the first (conditional) premise is in the second paragraph, support for the second premise is in the next paragraph, and there is a concluding paragraph that restates the original simple conditional argument. Also note that the title is the conclusion of the main argument.


Here is an alternative way to support the first premise (an alternative second paragraph):

If the gravity of the moon is always directed toward the moon, then the water on the side of the earth opposite the moon can only be drawn toward the moon. If the water on the side of the earth opposite the moon can only be drawn toward the moon, then the water on the side of the earth opposite the moon would be drawn toward the earth, which is between the water and the moon. If the water on the side of the earth opposite the moon would be drawn toward the earth, which is between the water and the moon, then the water on the side of the earth opposite the moon would have to be at a low tide due to the gravity of the moon. If the water on the side of the earth opposite the moon has to be at a low tide due to the gravity of the moon, then the observed high tide on earth opposite the moon can't be due to the gravity of the moon.

©Copyright 2001 - 2010
David R. Burgess
All Rights Reserved